SNAP Recipe Project- Curried Potatoes

“SNAP protects kids from hunger:Overall, SNAP is credited with reducing the likelihood of being food insecure by roughly 30%.”–nokidhungry factsheet

For this week’s SNAP recipe, I chose Curried Potatoes. This was mainly because I was looking through the “C’s” in the SNAP Recipe Finder Database, but also because I had potatoes on hand. Last minute cooking is how most of us end up eating…especially if we walk in the kitchen time with no planned menu items!

This recipe is great for that; though its not something that you microwave in 5 minutes, the ingredient list is fairly basic, and has a pretty long shelf life, so you don’t need to shop for these ingredients with the commitment to make it in the next few days or else the ingredients will go bad. Therefore, it can be there for you when you need a warm, hearty vegetable side dish. Here is the site’s recipe, with a few of my notes added in red. (Click to enlarge)

Curried potatoes recipe

I was very curious to see how this recipe would turn out. I have made curry before, as well as stews and soups that contain potatoes, and I like the soft potato that results. But, if Chad and I are cooking potatoes for a brunch, I want them CRISPY! As you can guess from reading about the addition of the broth, the recipe resulted in the softer type of potatoes.

DSC01508

Its pretty wet after you add the broth, but just cook it down until its the consistency you want.

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This was my endpoint.

Here are some more of my thoughts as Chad and I tried this affordable, tasty recipe:DSC01512

  • I would always at least double this recipe. Though its not exactly difficult, why not make extra for lunches or the next dinner and save yourself some work?
  • I used Russet potatoes, since that’s what I had, and they did turn out quite soft. If I made them again I’d boil them for less time to keep more of their structure. If you like a firmer potato, you could also use Yukon Gold, which keep their structure very well, even when slow-cooked in stews and soups.
  • I often get the “butter vs margarine” question, which could be a whole evening’s discussion for me and my fellow food geeks, but I feel either one would be fine here, as the butter isn’t so much for flavor, but a substrate to cook the onions. The rest of the flavors just bury the butter or margarine flavor–you could also use canola oil for a heart-healthy fat.
  • Curry isn’t one flavor, its a class of spice blends, and the variety is HUGE! There are sweet, red, green and Thai curry powders, to name just a few out of thousands! This is where most of your flavor will come from, so use a curry that has a flavor you like, and you’ll like these potatoes! (You also may need to play with amount you add, to get the intensity and richness you want.)
  • You could easily make this into a curry or stew-type dish: just add a variety of vegetables (I love cauliflower and chickpeas) and more broth to your liking.
  • When I think of curry, the meat I think of is chicken. You could prepare it separately or add it right to the dish.
  • And since its a SNAP recipe, it’s super-affordable at about 33 cents per serving!

This is a great base or starter recipe, and it pretty foolproof! After using it a couple times, I’m sure you will get a bit adventurous and start adding your own twists. And as it uses some different spices than some of us have grown up with (such as yours truly,) it opens the door to the wonderful, wide world of spices!

Eat well!

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