Inside-Out Omelets

Breakfast seems to give people trouble; they don’t want to eat it because they don’t want to take the time, and American breakfasts are often full of the most unhealthy parts of a diet (added sugars, salt and saturated fats.) As a dietitian, I often get breakfast-related questions, and know that despite the fact that people who eat breakfast are more likely to be at a healthy weight and more healthy in general, many people, including the children who we are supposed to be educating about the glories of breakfast, skip it!

I have already posted two breakfast-related posts, one a basic recipe for a breakfast sandwich, and the other about how a typical American breakfast differs from a healthier, Japanese breakfast. But aside from breakfast sandwiches and leftovers, I have found another breakfast favorite, an inside out-style omelet. How many people have salads or sides of veggies with their breakfast? Have you ever tried to cram a cup of veggies into a 2-3 egg omelet?  There just isn’t enough egg to bind it all together, leaving you with and unattractive egg-scramble-mash-thingy. But, since I want to have all my veggies without requiring a dozen eggs, I decided to make a few modifications to the omelet concept to give me a healthy dose of vegetables, which are often hard to get with breakfast.

Inside-Out Omelet

1. Choose your toppings. This is what you would normally put INSIDE the omelet–the “guts”. I generally stay with veggies and a strong cheese. I recently had a lot of leftover crudite (while that’s a “sushi” term, the “fish sticks” translation is relish tray!) so I used a mix of those. [See the notes at the end of the post for other flavor combinations.]

2013-06-13 08.19.18

A beautiful morning rainbow!

2. Heat 1/2 T of canola oil on a small/medium skillet to medium-high, chopping vegetables as you heat the pan. I chopped the asparagus smaller, since its a bit tougher, and separated the chives to add as a garnish.
2013-06-13 08.23.203. Saute the vegetables to your preferred doneness. I dislike mushy veggies, so I usually cook them for about 3-5 minutes. I also place them in the pan at the same time, which is less of a hassle. (This is where the size of your cuts can help you make sure everything is the way you want it.)
2013-06-13 08.27.314. Transfer the toppings to a bowl. There is probably enough oil in the pan to cook the eggs as well, so turn the heat to medium low and set the pan aside until you are ready to add the eggs.

2013-06-13 08.29.37

I don’t bother with a whisk or egg-beater; this is a quick weekday breakfast, so a fork is sufficient.

5. To keep things simple, I don’t add any milk to my omelet, though you can if you prefer. I use 2 whole eggs and one egg white, place in a bowl and mixed with a fork.

6. Place the pan back on the heat and pour the egg into the skillet. Depending on how soft you like your eggs and how hot your oven is, somewhere around 2-3 minutes should give you a cooked base. While its cooking, I season it by sprinkling the top with salt and pepper.

7. When the edges are set, roll the omelet. This takes a bit of practice, so don’t get discouraged if its not pretty the first time (it will taste fine and the toppings will cover the omelet, anyway!) You can roll it several times, fold it over once, or fold it into a square package…no rules here!Egg collage8. Because eggs have quite a large ability for carry-over cooking, the inside of the omelet will cook as long as the omelet is not too thick or you pan is too hot. (That would brown the bottom before the heat can reach up through the eggs, and I don’t happen to like browned eggs.) You can always keep the omelet in the pan a bit longer, cover it, and/or leave it in the warm pan while the heat is off to ensure its cooked to your liking on the inside.

9. Now comes the pretty part! Transfer your omelet to a plate, and top with your choice of “guts.” This omelet has the fresh chives added, as well as some reduced fat shredded cheese.

omelet

Healthy and hearty…more veggies than your average omelet could handle!

Nutritional Information (Rainbow Version):

Calories

Protein (g)

Fat (g)

Carbs (g)

Fiber (g)

2 whole large eggs

144

13

10

1

0

1 large egg white

17

4

0

0

0

½ T canola oil

60

0

7

0

0

¼ cup Asparagus

7

1

0

1

1

½ cup Bell pepper

15

1

0

3

2

¼ cup tomatoes

7

0

0

2

1

¼ C Reduced fat cheese

80

8

5

0

0

TOTAL

330

27

22

7

4

NOTES:

  • This omelet is a great source of healthy fats and lean protein, but a complete meal should include carbs as well. Add a piece of 100% whole wheat toast or some fruit to complete this healthy breakfast!
  • The amounts of veggies were an estimation, and the nutritional information was rounded to the nearest whole gram using the USDA National Nutrient Database.
  • Looking for more variety? Use can use almost anything you have on hand, but here are some ideas:
    • Tex Mex: Use chili pepper, cilantro, bell peppers and salsa with chili powder and cheese.
    • Puttanesca: Black olives, tomatoes, basil and capers with Parmesan cheese.
    • Greek: Tomatoes, olives, oregano with lime or lemon juice and feta cheese.
    • Use ANY fresh herbs from your garden or farmers market!

Try this simple, inside-out omelet method to keep your veggie intake high while getting a great source of protein (no expensive protein powders or unhealthy meats needed!) Have a healthy day!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s